Autonomous Robots Assist Clinics to Combat Coronavirus

coronavirus

Robots that can easily desinfect hospitals with UV light may slow down infections with coronavirus

The really best way to handle the coronavirus pandemic is obviously not to get coronavirus first. By now, you (hopefully) had all the techniques in your head to do this — wash your hands, keep away from big groups of people, washing your hands, stay home when you’re sick, wash your hands, stop traveling where possible, and please wash your hands, please.

Keeping surfaces disinfected is extremely necessary to avoid the transmission of coronavirus (and everything else) through clinics, but it is also dusty, dull, and (considering what you can get contaminated with) risky. And that’s why autonomous robots have an ideal mission.

coronavirus

UVD Robots is a Danish company that produces technologies capable of disinfecting patient rooms and hospital operating theatres. We can disinfect just about everything that you point at them. Every robot is a mobile array of powerful ultraviolet-C (UVC) short duration lights emitting enough energy to practically shred the DNA or RNA of any bacterium that has the misfortune of being exposed to it.

UV disinfecting engineering has been here for a generation or so, and is generally used to clean drinking water. You don’t see it much around the fixed infrastructure because for a few minutes you have to aim a UV lamp precisely to a surface to be successful, and since it can cause harm to the skin and eyes, people have to be careful around it.

Mobile UVC decontamination systems are a little more common— UV lamps on a cart that can be carried from area to area to disinfect other places, such as aircraft. Operating UV systems manually can be costly and have inconsistent outcomes for large environments such as a hospital with hundreds of rooms— humans can unintentionally miss certain fields, or not expose them long enough.

The robots have been developed to resolve hospital-acquired infections which are a major global concern. According to Nielsen, 5 to 10 percent of hospitalized patients globally will get a new infection while in the hospital, and hundreds of thousands of people die each year from these infections. The UVD robots were aimed at helping hospitals avoid such infections in the first place

The robots have been developed to resolve hospital-acquired infections which are a major global concern. According to Nielsen, 5 to 10 percent of hospitalized patients globally will get a new infection while in the hospital, and hundreds of thousands of people die each year from these illnesses. The UVD robots were aimed at helping hospitals avoid such infections in the first place.

The robots, which cost around US$ 80,000 and US$ 90,000, are fairly inexpensive for hospital equipment, and the recent interest in them has been considerable as you would expect.
They will be examined at other medical facilities across the United States during the next few days, and Nielsen points out they could be useful in schools, cruises, or in other fairly controlled spaces.